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UN Committee against Torture to review Antigua and Barbuda, Ireland, Panama and Paraguay

GENEVA (18 July 2017) - The UN Committee against Torture is meeting in Geneva from 24 July to 11 August to review the following countries in sessions that will be webcast live: Antigua and Barbuda (24-25 July); Ireland (27-28); Panama (3-4August) and Paraguay (26-27 July).

The above are among the 162 States parties to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and so are required to undergo regular reviews by the Committee on how they are implementing the Convention and the Committee’s previous recommendations.  

The Committee, which is composed of 10 independent experts, will engage in a dialogue with the respective government delegations. The public sessions, held at Palais Wilson in Geneva, begin at 10:00 Geneva time and continue at 15:00 the following day. The sessions will be webcast live at: http://webtv.un.org/.

Further information is available here.

The Committee will publish its findings, officially known as concluding observations, on the respective states here on 11August. A news conference to discuss the findings is scheduled for 12.30, on 11 August at the Palais des Nations in Geneva. 

For media accreditation please go here.    

ENDS

For media requests please contact:

Nicoleta Panta,  +41(0) 22 9179310/npanta@ohchr.org

ENDS

What is the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment?

The Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (known as the United Nations Convention against Torture) is the most important international human rights treaty that deals exclusively with torture. The Convention obligates countries who have become party to the treaty to prohibit and prevent torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment in all circumstances.

The Convention entered into force on 26 June 1987 and currently has 162 states parties. Thus, the vast majority of the member states of the UN (193) have voluntarily agreed to prohibit any form of torture. More information here.