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Human Rights Council concludes twenty-eighth session after adopting 37 texts

ROUNDUP

27 March 2015

Creates new mandates on right to privacy and rights of persons with albinism, also adopts resolutions on Syria, Libya and Iraq

The Human Rights Council concluded its twenty-eighth regular session this evening after adopting 34 resolutions on a wide range of issues, as well as three Presidential Statements and its report for the session. The Council also adopted the outcome of the Universal Periodic Review of 15 countries.

The Council decided to create the mandate of a Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy and a mandate of an Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights of persons with albinism. It extended mandates on cultural rights, environment, and private military companies, and established a forum on human rights, democracy and the rule of law. The Council extended mandates on Syria, Iran, Democratic People's Republic of Korea and Myanmar. The Council also extended the mandate on Mali, and adopted resolutions on Libya, Iraq, Guinea and Haiti. The mandates of the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights, the Independent Expert on human rights and environment, and the open-ended intergovernmental working group on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies were also extended.

In the resolution on the right to privacy in the digital age, the Council decided to establish the mandate of a Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy, for a period of three years. Another new mandate, that of an Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights of persons with albinism, was also created for an initial period of three years. The Council decided to extend by a further three years the mandates of the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights, the Independent Expert on human rights and environment, and the open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies. A resolution was adopted in which the Council decided to establish a forum to provide a platform for identifying best practices, challenges and opportunities to secure respect for human rights, democracy and the rule of law.

The Council condemned in the strongest possible terms widespread and grave abuses by Da’esh in Iraq and urged the Iraqi Government to investigate all alleged abuses and violations of human rights and international humanitarian law. In a resolution on technical assistance and capacity-building to improve human rights in Libya, the Council requested the High Commissioner to urgently dispatch a mission to investigate violations and abuses of international human rights law in Libya by the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Da’esh in Libya) and other terrorist organizations with a view to ensuring full accountability. In a resolution on the continuing grave deterioration in the human rights and humanitarian situation in Syria the Council extended for one year the mandate of the Commission of Inquiry on Syria and requested it to provide an oral update at the twenty-ninth session of the Human Rights Council and written updated reports at the thirtieth and thirty-first sessions.

In the text on the human rights situation in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the Council decided to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur of the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea for a period of one year, and to convene, at its thirtieth session, a panel discussion on the situation of human rights in this country, including the issue of international abductions, enforced disappearances and related matters. The Council extended for one year both the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on Myanmar and the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on Iran. The Council extended for a period of one year the mandate of the Independent Expert on Mali. In a resolution on strengthening technical cooperation in Guinea, the Council called on the Government of Guinea to ensure that the elections to be held in 2015 were conducted in a peaceful and transparent manner, and called on the international community to support Guinea’s efforts in the fight against Ebola.

The Council adopted texts on the prevention of genocide, use of drones, persons with disabilities, illicit funds, foreign debt, right to food, and birth registration. Other adopted texts pertained to the right to work and to the effects of terrorism on the enjoyment of human rights. A text was also adopted on investment in the rights of the child. The Council decided to convene, at its twenty-ninth session, a panel discussion on the effects of terrorism. In a resolution on the right to work, the Council expressed concern that global unemployment stood at 201.3 million in 2014 and requested the High Commissioner for Human Rights to prepare a report on the subject. In another text the Council requested the High Commissioner to prepare a study on the impact of the world drug problem on the enjoyment of human rights and decided to convene a panel discussion on the matter at its thirtieth session.

The Council adopted a resolution on freedom of religion or belief in which it expressed deep concern at emerging obstacles to the enjoyment of the right to freedom of religion or belief, as well as instances of religious intolerance, discrimination and violence. Additionally, the Council adopted a separate text on combatting intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief. The Council decided to focus its next full-day meeting on the rights of the child on the theme of “Information and communications technology and child sexual exploitation” and requested the Office of the High Commissioner to prepare a report on that issue.

Under its agenda item on the Human Rights Situation in Palestine and Other Occupied Arab Territories the Council adopted four resolutions: on human rights in the occupied Syrian Golan; on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination; on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and in the occupied Syrian Golan; and on the human rights situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem.

The High Commissioner was also requested to establish specific and public targets and deadlines to achieve the broadest geographical diversity of his staff, and to consider applying a cap on the representation of countries and regions already overrepresented in his Office. In a text on international cooperation, the Council requested the Office of the High Commissioner to enhance dialogue with representatives from non-traditional donor countries with a view to broaden the donor base and replenish the resources available to the Universal Periodic Review Voluntary Trust Fund and the Voluntary Fund for Financial and Technical Assistance.

The Council also adopted three Presidential Statements. The first concerned the seventieth anniversary of the end of the Second World War, and in which the Council called upon States to unite their efforts in dealing with challenges and threats to international peace and security, with the United Nations playing a central role. A second Presidential Statement adopted was on the twentieth anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women and Adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. A third President Statement concerned the situation of human rights in Haiti in which the Council welcomed and endorsed the request of the Haitian authorities to renew for one year the mandate of the Independent Expert.

The Council also elected four mandate holders by acclamation. They are as follows: Albert Kwokwo Barume (Democratic Republic of the Congo) as the African member of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; Idriss Jazairy (Algeria), as the Special Rapporteur on the negative impact of unilateral coercive measures on the enjoyment of human rights; Rhona Smith (United Kingdom), as the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia; and Dante Pesce (Chile) as the Latin American and Caribbean Member of the Working Group on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises.

The Council adopted its report of the twenty-eighth session, which is available on its website.

In concluding remarks Joachim Rücker, President of the Human Rights Council, said all in all, and after having presided many meetings in the past four weeks, I am confident that we contributed further to the promotion and protection of human rights for all. Let us now all together translate our work into tangible results to make a difference for human rights on the ground.

The twenty-eighth session of the Human Rights Council took place from 2 to 27 March 2015. Documentation, statements, resolutions and reports relating to this and all Human Rights Council sessions are available on its webpage. Detailed, speaker-by-speaker coverage of every public meeting can be found on the webpage of the United Nations Information Service Geneva.

The Human Rights Council will next meet at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, 1 April 2015 to hold a Special Session “in light of the terrorist attacks and human rights abuses and violations committed by the terrorist group Boko Haram”. The next regular session of the Human Rights Council will take place from 15 June to 3 July 2015. More information is available on the Council’s webpage.

Summary of the Session


Opening the twenty-eighth session of the Human Rights Council United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein delivered a powerful statement in which he said: “Together, if we succeed in turning the corner, in improving our global condition, we can then say the screams of history and of the millions upon millions of victims, have been heard, finally. Let us make it so.The opening meeting also featured video messages from United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and President of the General Assembly Sam Kutesa, and statements by Joachim Rücker, President of the Human Rights Council and Swiss Minister of Foreign Affairs Didier Burkhalter.

During its four-day High-level Segment, the Council heard addresses from a Head of State, a Prime Minister, many Government Ministersand other senior dignitaries in relation to human rights matters of national interest and concern. Two high-level panel discussions were convened, on the question of the death penalty and on human rights mainstreaming. The Independent International Commissions of Inquiry on Syria and Eritrea presented updates to the Council, followed by interactive dialogues with States and non-governmental organisations. The Commission of Inquiry on the 2014 Gaza Conflict requested more time to prepare its report and the Council agreed it could make its presentation at the June 2015 session.

The human rights situation in countries including Iraq, Iran, Myanmar, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Central African Republic, Haiti, Cote d’Ivoire and Mali were discussed. Presentations were given by 27 Special Procedures consisting of individual human rights experts, working groups and a forum. The programme featured a panel discussion on national policies and human rights, a thematic discussion on technical cooperation and a timely full-day debate on human rights and climate change. Other highlights included the annual full-day meeting on the rights of the child, the annual interactive debate on the rights of persons with disabilities, a debate on the state of racial discrimination worldwide and the Council’s annual thematic discussion on technical cooperation.

Country and thematic reports submitted by the Secretary-General and the High Commissioner were presented to the Council, which also held general debates, including those concerning human rights situations requiring its attention, human rights bodies and mechanisms and the Universal Periodic Review, the human rights situation in Palestine and other occupied Arab territories, and technical assistance and capacity-building in the field of human rights. During the session the Council approved the outcomes of the Universal Periodic Reviews of (in order of review): Italy, El Salvador, Bolivia, Fiji, San Marino, Kazakhstan, Angola, Iran, Iraq, Madagascar, Slovenia, Egypt, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Gambia.

Resolutions and Decisions


Action on Texts Under Agenda Item 1 on Organizational and Procedural Matters


In a statement by the President of the Human Rights Council (A/HRC/28/L.35) on the Twentieth Anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women and Adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, adopted without a vote, the Council called upon States to take concrete steps towards promoting and protecting all human rights of women and girl. It endorsed the pledge made by States in the political declaration on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the Fourth World Conference on Women adopted at the fifty-ninth session of the Commission on the Status of Women on 9 March 2015.

In a statement by the President of the Human Rights Council (A/HRC/28/L.37) on the situation of human rights in Haiti, adopted without a vote, the Council welcomed and endorses the request of the Haitian authorities to renew for one year the mandate of the Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in Haiti. The Council invited the Independent Expert to assist the Government of Haiti in the implementation of his recommendations and those issued by other Special Procedures and to present its report on the situation of human rights in Haiti to March 2016 session of the Human Rights Council.

In a statement by the President of the Human Rights Council (A/HRC/28/L.44) on the seventieth anniversary of the end of the Second World War, adopted without a vote, the Council recalled that 2015 marked the seventieth anniversary of the end of the Second World War and paid tribute to all victims of the Second World War. The Council stressed that that historic event established the conditions for the creation of the United Nations, designed to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war and to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights and dignity of the human person. The Council called upon the Member States of the United Nations to unite their efforts in dealing with challenges and threats to international peace and security, with the United Nations playing a central role.

Action on Resolution Under Agenda Item 2 on the Annual Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights


In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.13) on the composition of staff of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, adopted by a vote of 31 in favour, 16 against and no abstentions as orally revised, the Council requested the High Commissioner to establish targets and deadlines to achieve the broadest geographical diversity of his staff and to consider applying a cap on the representation of countries and regions already overrepresented in his Office. It invited the General Assembly and its appropriate subsidiary bodies to consider the resolution and the relevant sections of the report of the Joint Inspection Unit. The High Commissioner was requested to submit a comprehensive and updated report to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-third session.

Action on Resolutions Under Agenda Item 3 on the Promotion and Protection of All Human Rights

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.1) on enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, adopted without a vote, the Council requested the Office of the High Commissioner to seek to enhance dialogue with representatives from non-traditional donor countries with a view to broaden the donor base and replenish the resources available to the Universal Periodic Review Voluntary Trust Fund and the Voluntary Fund for Financial and Technical Assistance.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.2) on ensuring use of remotely piloted aircraft or armed drones in counter-terrorism and military operations in accordance with international law, including international human rights and humanitarian law, adopted by a vote of 29 in favour, 6 against and 12 abstentions, the Council invited the High Commissioner for Human Rights and relevant special procedures of the Human Rights Council and the human rights treaty bodies to pay attention to violations of international law as a result of the use of remotely piloted aircraft or armed drones.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.5) on the right of persons with disabilities to live independently and be included in the community on an equal basis with others, adopted without a vote as orally revised, the Council called upon States that were not yet party to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to ensure that persons with disabilities could effectively and fully enjoy the right to living independently and being included in the community on an equal basis with others. It also called upon States to ensure that all international cooperation was inclusive of persons with disabilities.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.8) on the negative impact of the non-repatriation of funds of illicit origin to the countries of origin on the enjoyment of human rights, and the importance of improving international cooperation, adopted by a vote of 33 in favour, 2 against and 12 abstentions, as orally revised, the Council requested the Independent Expert to convene an expert meeting on the issue of the negative impact of the non-repatriation of funds of illicit origin to the countries of origin on the enjoyment of human rights and to include the outcome of that meeting in a study that he will present to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.10) on an Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights of persons with albinism, adopted without a vote, the Council decided to appoint, for a period of three years, an Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights of persons with albinism. The Independent Expert was requested to report to the Human Rights Council, starting from its thirty-first session, and to the General Assembly.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.11/Rev.1) on the renewal of the mandate of the open-ended intergovernmental working group to consider the possibility of elaborating an international regulatory framework on the regulation, monitoring and oversight of the activities of private military and security companies, adopted by a vote of 32 in favour, 13 against and 2 abstentions, the Council decided to extend the mandate of the open-ended intergovernmental working group for a further period of two and a half years in order for it to undertake and fulfil the mandate.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.12) on freedom of religion or belief, adopted without a vote as orally revised, the Council expressed deep concern at emerging obstacles to the enjoyment of the right to freedom of religion or belief, as well as instances of religious intolerance, discrimination and violence. The Council requested the Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief to report annually to the Human Rights Council and to the General Assembly.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.14) on the effects of foreign debt and other related international financial obligations of States on the full enjoyment of all human rights, particularly economic, social and cultural rights, adopted by a vote of 31 in favour, 14 against and one abstention, the Council requested the Independent Expert on the effects of foreign debt to report to the General Assembly on the issue of the effects of foreign debt on the full enjoyment of all human rights. The Independent Expert was requested to submit a report on the implementation of the present resolution to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.15) on the mandate of the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights, adopted without a vote, the Council decided to extend, for a period of three years, the mandate of the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights. The Council called upon all Governments to cooperate with and assist the Special Rapporteur in the discharge of the mandate.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.16) on the right to food, adopted without a vote, the Council requested the Special Rapporteur on the right to food to continue to monitor the evolution of the world food crisis and to keep the Human Rights Council informed of the impact of the crisis on the enjoyment of the right to food. The Council considered it intolerable that more than one third of the children who died every year before the age of five died from hunger-related illness, and that about 805 million people worldwide suffered from chronic hunger while the planet could produce enough food to feed everyone around the world.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.19) on human rights and the environment, adopted without a vote as orally revised, the Council decided to extend the mandate of the Independent Expert on human rights obligations relating to the enjoyment of a safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment as a special rapporteur for a period of three years. The Special Rapporteur was requested to convene an environmentally friendly expert seminar on human rights obligations relating to the enjoyment of a safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment, challenges and the way forward and to submit a report on it to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.20) on the question of the realization in all countries of economic, social and cultural rights, adopted without a vote, the Council requested the Secretary-General to continue to prepare and submit to the Human Rights Council an annual report on the question of the realization in all countries of economic, social and cultural rights with a special focus on a compilation of best practices adopted by States to measure progress in the realization of economic, social and cultural rights, including national indicators to advance the realization of such rights.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.23) on birth registration and the right of everyone to recognition everywhere as a person before the law, adopted without a vote, the Council requested the High Commissioner to identify and actively pursue opportunities in order to strengthen existing policies and programmes aimed at universal birth registration and vital statistics development. It requested the High Commissioner to prepare a report on efforts made, to be submitted to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-third session.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.24) on human rights, democracy and the rule of law, adopted by a vote of 35 in favour, none against and 12 abstentions, the Council decided to establish a forum on human rights, democracy and the rule of law to provide a platform for promoting dialogue and cooperation on those issues. The Council decided that the Forum shall meet every two years for two working days allocated to thematic discussions and that the theme of the first session of the Forum, to be held in 2016, will be “Widening the democratic space: the role of youth in public decision-making”.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.25) on the prevention of genocide, adopted without a vote, the Council recommended that the General Assembly designate 9 December as the International Day of Commemoration and Dignity of the Victims of Genocide in order to raise awareness of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide and its role in combatting and preventing the crime of genocide. The Council invited the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide to an interactive dialogue with the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session on the progress made in discharging his duties.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.26) on the right to work, adopted without a vote, the Council expressed concern that global unemployment stood at 201.3 million in 2014 and expressed deep concern that approximately 74.5 million young people were unemployed. The Council requested the High Commissioner for Human Rights to prepare a report on the realization of the right to work and to submit it to the Human Rights Council prior to its thirty-first session.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.27) on the right to privacy in the digital age, adopted without a vote, the Council decided to appoint, for a period of three years, a special rapporteur on the right to privacy. The Council invited the Special Rapporteur to include in the first report considerations on the right to privacy in the digital age and called upon all States to cooperate fully with and assist the Special Rapporteur in the performance of the mandate.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.28) on the rights of the child: towards better investment in the rights of the child, adopted without a vote, the Council decided to focus its next full-day meeting on the rights of the child on the theme of “Information and communications technology and child sexual exploitation” and requested the Office of the High Commissioner to prepare a report on that issue.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.30) on the effects of terrorism on the enjoyment of human rights, adopted by a vote of 25 in favour, 16 against and 6 abstentions, the Council strongly condemned all terrorist acts, and expressed grave concern at their detrimental effects on human rights. The Council decided to convene, at its twenty-ninth session, a panel discussion on the effects of terrorism on the enjoyment by all persons of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Action on Resolutions Under the Agenda Item 4 on Human Rights Situations that Require the Council’s Attention


In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.6) on the continuing grave deterioration in the human rights and humanitarian situation in the Syrian Arab Republic, adopted by a vote of 29 in favour, 6 against and 12 abstentions, the Council decided to extend for one year the mandate of the Independent International Commission of Inquiry on the Syrian Arab Republic and demanded that the Syrian authorities cooperate fully with it. The Council also requested the Commission of Inquiry to provide an oral update at the twenty-ninth session of the Human Rights Council and to present written updated reports at the thirtieth and thirty-first sessions.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.17) on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, adopted by a vote of 20 in favour, 11 against and 16 abstentions, the Council decided to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran for a further period of one year, and requested the Special Rapporteur to submit a report on the implementation of his mandate to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session and to the General Assembly at its seventieth session.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.18) on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, adopted by a vote of 27 in favour, 6 against and 14 abstentions, the Council condemned in the strongest terms the long-standing and ongoing systematic, widespread and gross human rights violations and other human rights abuses committed in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and decided to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur of the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea for a period of one year.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.21/Rev.1) on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, adopted without a vote, the Council decided to extend for one year the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar. The Council invited the Special Rapporteur to include in his or her next report further recommendations on the needs of Myanmar, including information on the progress in the electoral process and reform in the run-up to the 2015 elections as well as in the post-electoral period.

Action on Resolutions Under Agenda Item 7 on the Human Rights Situation in Palestine and Other Occupied Arab Territories


In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.3) on human rights in the occupied Syrian Golan, adopted by a vote of 29 in favour, 1 against and 17 abstentions, the Council called upon Israel, the occupying Power, to comply with the relevant resolutions of the General Assembly, the Security Council and the Human Rights Council and requested the Secretary-General to disseminate the present resolution as widely as possible and to report on this matter to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.32) on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, adopted by a vote of 45 in favour, 1 against and 1 abstention, the Council reaffirmed the inalienable, permanent and unqualified right of the Palestinian people to self-determination and urged all Member States and relevant bodies of the United Nations system to support and assist the Palestinian people in the early realization of their right to self- determination.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.33) on Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and in the occupied Syrian Golan, adopted by a vote of 45 in favour, 1 against and 1 abstentions, the Council requested the High Commissioner for Human Rights to present a report detailing the implementation of the recommendations contained in the report of the independent fact-finding mission on the implications of Israeli settlements on the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of the Palestinian People throughout the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.34) on the human rights situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, adopted by a vote of 43 in favour, 1 against and 3 abstentions, the Council stressed the need for Israel, the occupying Power, to withdraw from the Palestinian territory occupied since 1967, including East Jerusalem, so as to enable the Palestinian people to exercise its universally recognized right to self-determination.

Action on Resolution under Agenda Item 8 on Follow-up to and the Implementation of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.22) on the contribution of the Human Rights Council to the special session of the General Assembly on the world drug problem of 2016, adopted without a vote, the Council requested the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to prepare a study to be presented to the Human Rights Council at its thirtieth session, on the impact of the world drug problem on the enjoyment of human rights. The Council also decided to convene a panel discussion at its thirtieth session on the impact of the world drug problem on the enjoyment of human rights and requested the Office of the High Commissioner to prepare a report on the panel discussion in the form of a summary.

Action on Resolution under Agenda Item 9 on Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.4) on combatting intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief, adopted without a vote, the Council deeply condemned any advocacy of religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence, whether it involves the use of print, audio-visual or electronic media or any other means. The Council requested the High Commissioner to prepare and submit to the Human Rights Council, at its thirty-first session, a comprehensive follow-up report with elaborated conclusions and potential follow-up measures.

Action on Resolutions Under Agenda Item 10 on Technical Assistance and Capacity-Building


In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.7/Rev.1) on technical assistance and capacity-building to improve human rights in Libya, adopted without a vote, the Council condemned in the strongest terms the terrorist acts, hostage-taking and violence committed against civilians by the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Da’esh in Libya) and other terrorist organizations. The Council requested the High Commissioner urgently to dispatch a mission to investigate violations and abuses of international human rights law that had been committed in Libya since the beginning of 2014 with a view to avoiding impunity and ensuring full accountability and to submit to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session, a written report on its findings.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.9) on technical assistance and capacity building in the field of human rights in Mali, adopted without a vote, the Council decided to extend for a period of one year the mandate of the Independent Expert on the human rights situation in Mali, and asked him to report to the Council at its session in March 2016. The Council requested the High Commissioner to provide technical assistance to the Government of Mali, including the Commission on truth, justice and reconciliation

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.29) on technical assistance and capacity building in strengthening human rights in Iraq in light of the abuses committed by Da’esh and associated terrorist groups, adopted without a vote, the Council condemned in the strongest possible terms grave abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law committed by Da’esh and associated terrorist groups and strongly condemned in particular all violence committed against persons based on their religion or ethnicity, as well as attacks on civilians. The Council requested the High Commissioner for Human Rights to provide technical assistance to the Government of Iraq and to provide a written report on it at the 30th Session of the Human Rights Council in September 2015.

In a resolution (A/HRC/28/L.31/Rev.1) on the strengthening of technical cooperation and advisory services in Guinea, adopted without a vote, the Council called upon the Government of Guinea to ensure that the elections to be held in 2015 took place in conditions of peace, transparency and security. The Council invited the High Commissioner to submit to the Human Rights Council at its thirty-first session a report on the situation of human rights and the work of his Office in Guinea.

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