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Report

Call for inputs to a report on "the right to privacy in the digital age (2022)"

Issued by

OHCHR

Published

02 September 2022

Report

Issued by Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

Subjects

Civic space, Digital privacy

Symbol Number

A/HRC/51/17

Background

Objectives

On 7 October 2021, the Human Rights Council adopted resolution 48/4 on “The right to privacy in the digital age”. Paragraph 11 of the resolution requested the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights " to prepare a written report identifying recent trends and challenges with regard to the human right to privacy, including those addressed in the present resolution, to identify and clarify related human rights principles, safeguards and best practices, and to present the report to the Human Rights Council at its fifty-first session, to be followed by an interactive dialogue”.

Key questions and types of input sought

The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights now invites all relevant stakeholders to provide inputs for the preparation of the thematic report, focusing on the following aspects:

  • trends and challenges with regard to the promotion and protection of the right to privacy in the digital age;
  • related human rights principles, safeguards and best practices.

The following list of issues, albeit not meant to be exhaustive, aims to assist interested stakeholders in preparing their submission:

  • targeted and mass surveillance, including of journalists and human rights defenders;
  • access of state authorities to personal data collected by companies, including in cross-border contexts;
  • use of publicly accessible information and data by state authorities, for example when monitoring social media;
  • measures relying on digital technology taken to combat the Covid-19 pandemic;
  • digital identity systems rolled out by States and companies;
  • use of biometrics for identification and authentication;
  • use of encryption and anonymity technologies;
  • tracking of internet users;
  • new or rapidly evolving technologies or business models, including blockchain-based products and services and neurotechnology;
  • discriminatory impacts of privacy invasions on individuals and/or groups at risk.