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Human Rights Council Adopts 10 Resolutions, Extending Mandates on Eritrea, Business and Human Rights, Extrajudicial Executions, Human Rights and International Solidarity, Right to Education, Leprosy (Hansen’s Disease), Trafficking in Persons, and Extreme Poverty and Human Rights

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13 July 2023
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In Dialogue on Ukraine, High Commissioner For Human Rights Urges States Not To Use Cluster Ammunitions

The Human Rights Council this afternoon adopted 10 resolutions, extending mandates on Eritrea, business and human rights, extrajudicial executions, human rights and international solidarity, right to education, leprosy (Hansen’s Disease), trafficking in persons, and extreme poverty and human rights.  It also adopted resolutions on human rights and climate change, and the enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights.

At the beginning of the meeting, the Council concluded an interactive dialogue with the High Commissioner for Human Rights on reports on Ukraine, and heard the presentation of a report on Georgia. 

On the situation of human rights in Eritrea, the Council adopted by a vote of 18 in favour, 7 against and 21 abstentions, a resolution in which it decided to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Eritrea for a further period of one year.  It also decided to hold an enhanced interactive dialogue on the situation of human rights in Eritrea at its fifty-fifth session.

Concerning business and human rights, the Council extended the mandate of the Working Group on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises for a period of three years and invited it to chair the Forum on Business and Human Rights.

On the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, the Council called on all States to conduct prompt, effective, thorough, independent, impartial and transparent investigations into all suspected cases of extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions: and decided to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur for three years.

As for the mandate of the Independent Expert on human rights and international solidarity, the Council adopted by a vote of 31 in favour, 13 against and 3 abstentions a resolution in which it decided to extend the mandate of Independent Expert for a period of three years; and requested the Independent Expert to continue to examine in his reports ways and means of overcoming existing and emerging obstacles to the realisation of the right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity.

Concerning the right to education, the Council decided to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the right to education for a further period of three years; and called on States to take appropriate measures to accelerate efforts to bridge the digital divide and technological gaps in order to increase digital competencies while ensuring the protection of personal data.

On the elimination of discrimination against persons affected by leprosy (Hansen’s disease) and their family members, the Council decided to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur, under the title Special Rapporteur on the elimination of discrimination against persons affected by leprosy (Hansen’s disease) and their family members, for a period of three years; and called upon all States to cooperate with the Special Rapporteur in the discharge of the mandate.

As for trafficking in persons, especially women and children, the Council urged States to protect, respect and fulfil the human rights of victims of trafficking, and to prevent and to fight trafficking in persons, especially women and children, for the purpose of all forms of exploitation; and decided to extend the mandate of Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, for a period of three years.

On extreme poverty and human rights, the Council decided to extend, for a period of three years, the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights; and to undertake thematic research with a view to advising States and relevant State institutions on the eradication of extreme poverty in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

Concerning human rights and climate change, the Council decided that the annual panel discussion to be held at its fifty-sixth session shall focus on ensuring livelihood resilience in the context of the risk of loss and damage related to the adverse effects of climate change. 

On the enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, the Council adopted by a vote of 33 in favour, 13 against and 3 abstentions a resolution in which it requested the High Commissioner to organise a series of regional seminars on the contribution of North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation to the enjoyment of all human rights.

At the beginning of the meeting, Volker Türk, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, speaking in concluding remarks at the end of an interactive dialogue on reports on Ukraine, said that many organizations on the ground were working on documenting violations in Ukraine.  Despite challenges, the United Nations country team in Ukraine continued to reach people who needed assistance.  There had been a strong political will from Ukrainian authorities to prosecute conflict-based sexual violence.  He urged States not to use cluster ammunitions which had a terrible impact on civilians.

In the discussion, some speakers reiterated their condemnation of the unprovoked attack against an independent country by another, unequivocally condemning the Russian invasion and calling on the Russia Federation to withdraw its troops from Ukraine and fully respect the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of that country.  Some speakers said this was a politicised and biased assessment of the situation, and did not promote the resolution of human rights issues in the field.  The oral report was manipulative and lacked objectivity, undermining the noble cause of human rights, and manipulating the Council for geo-political reasons.

Speaking in the discussion were Cyprus, Belarus, Croatia, Bulgaria, Latvia, Russian Federation, Nicaragua and France.

Also speaking were Ukrainian Parliament Commissioner for Human Rights, Conscience and Peace Tax International, Institute for Human Rights, World Federation of Ukrainian Women's Organizations, Human Rights House Foundation, Catholic International Education Office, Physicians for Human Rights, International Bar Association, Institute for Reporters Freedom and Safety, International Federation for Human Rights Leagues, and the Next Century Foundation.

Christian Salazar, Director of Field Operations and Technical Cooperation Division of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, presenting the High Commissioner’s oral update on cooperation with Georgia, as mandated in Council resolution 52/40, said as in previous years, technical assistance had continued to be provided to the Government, civil society and other actors to strengthen the promotion and protection of human rights in that country.  The next report would provide updates on the situation, and provide human rights challenges in various regions in the country. 

Georgia, speaking as a country concerned, said international mechanisms including the United Nations were denied access by the Russian Federation to the occupied areas.  The consequences of the Russian occupation had been widely illustrated in previous reports, speaking about the persistent reoccurrences of human rights violations, particularly affecting ethnic-Georgians. 

Speaking in right of reply at the end of the agenda item was the Russian Federation.

The webcast of the Human Rights Council meetings can be found here.  All meeting summaries can be found here.  Documents and reports related to the Human Rights Council’s fifty-third regular session can be found here.

The Council will resume its work at 10 a.m. on Thursday, 13 July, to continue to take action on draft resolutions and decisions before concluding its fifty-third regular session on Friday, 14 July.

Interactive Dialogue on the Oral Presentation of the High Commissioner on the Findings of the Periodic Report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Situation of Human Rights in Ukraine and the Interim Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in the Temporarily Occupied Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the City of Sevastopol, Ukraine

The interactive dialogue on the oral presentation of the High Commissioner on the findings of the periodic report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on the situation of human rights in Ukraine and the interim report of the Secretary-General on the situation of human rights in the temporarily occupied Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the City of Sevastopol, Ukraine, started in the previous meeting and a summary can be found here.

Discussion

In the discussion, some speakers reiterated their condemnation of the unprovoked attack against an independent country by another, unequivocally condemning the Russian invasion and calling on the Russian Federation to withdraw its troops from Ukraine and fully respect the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of that country.  Russia’s attacks against Ukrainian civilian infrastructure, including medical and educational facilities, and the recent destruction of Kakhovka dam, had had an immeasurable effect on the life and health of civilians in the surrounding areas, and had aggravated the already critical humanitarian situation.  All unlawful transfers of civilians, including children, to Russia or Belarus, or within the occupied territories, including to Crimea, were condemned.  What Russia had perpetrated in Ukraine was a list of infamy.

A number of speakers expressed concern about the arbitrary detention and subjection to torture and ill-treatment, including sexual violence, committed on the territory of Ukraine by Russian Armed Forces.  The human rights situation in the Crimean Peninsula was continuously deteriorating through enforced disappearances, arbitrary arrests and ubiquitous harassment. Russian forces kept on committing indiscriminate attacks against civilians and civilian infrastructure, including schools, hospitals, commercial centres and train stations.  Recent attacks in Kramatorsk and Lvov were just some of many examples of human rights violations committed by Russia, which could amount to war crimes.  Speakers were appalled by killings of civilians, including women and children, unlawful confinements, use of torture, conflict-related sexual and gender-based violence, and particularly by forced deportations of Ukrainian children.

In Crimea and the rest of Ukraine, there were clear indications of international human rights law and international humanitarian law violations.  Independent human rights monitors, including the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, must be granted regular and unimpeded access to areas of detainees in the hands of the Russian Federation.  These violations of international humanitarian law and international human rights law highlighted once again the need for all perpetrators to be held accountable.  Some speakers supported the establishment of a special tribunal for the crime of aggression against Ukraine.  The prosecution of those responsible would be a clear signal to all perpetrators in all conflicts that they too would be held accountable.  The Russian Federation must grant full, regular and unfettered access to the United Nations monitors, including the Office of the High Commissioner, to all areas in the territory of Ukraine which it unlawfully occupied.

Forcible transfers and deportation of civilians were war crimes and may amount to crimes against humanity.  All victims should have access to remedies and all perpetrators must be held accountable.  Some speakers supported all efforts towards full accountability for all international law violations committed on the territory of Ukraine.

Some speakers said this was a politicised and biased assessment of the situation, and did not promote the resolution of human rights issues in the field.  The oral report was manipulative and lacked objectivity, undermining the noble cause of human rights, and manipulating the Council for geo-political reasons.  Human rights were very important but their implementation depended on the situation.  The report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights was once again flawed, and did not fully present the crimes committed by the Ukrainian side, although it did contain details of Ukraine’s expansion of the use of arbitrary detentions and torture.  The civilian population was cruelly punished for collaboration with Russia in areas where the Russian troops had withdrawn, and this was not being investigated.  Ethnic minorities in Ukraine were under attack.  Western States and the Office largely ignored the crimes committed by the Ukrainian authorities: they should pay attention and react to them.

Among the questions raised were: had the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights documented incidents that could be construed as intimidation or harassment of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church; was freedom of religion being observed in Ukraine; what further actions could the Council take, aimed at supporting measures for ensuring accountability in Ukraine; what could be the best way to intensify efforts on fact-finding and evidence-collection in order to ensure accountability for all crimes under international law committed on the territory of Ukraine; and was the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights going to continue to work with the International Committee of the Red Cross and push for access to detained prisoners in the occupied territories, including the Crimea.

Concluding Remarks

VOLKER TÜRK, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, asked the international community to support all accountability actors in Ukraine, including his Office, the Fact-Finding Mission, the Criminal Courts, and other stakeholders.  There was a need to strengthen the capacities of national institutions to provide technical assistance, in areas such as forensic expertise.  Many organizations on the ground were working on documenting violations.  They were in direct contact with victims, provided assistance and came forward with important information.  There needed to be a victim-centred approach to avoid duplication and traumatisation of victims.  The Office was working in this vein and Mr. Türk urged the international community to support this approach. 

Despite challenges, the United Nations country team in Ukraine continued to reach people who needed assistance; over 127,000 people had received psychological support, nearly 28,000 of those were survivors of conflict-based sexual violence who received special support.  There had been a strong political will from Ukrainian authorities to prosecute conflict-based sexual violence.  National institutions and civil society needed to be supported to provide services to these people, and the assistance provided needed to be adapted to both men and women. 

The High Commissioner said the strikes on essential infrastructure had negatively affected human rights and impacted the most vulnerable.  It needed to be ensured that Ukraine’s social protection was strengthened to ensure these people received the care they needed.  States were urged not to use cluster ammunitions which had a terrible impact on civilians.  There was long-standing cooperation with the Committee of the Red Cross.  Access was always urgently needed, especially in detention facilities in occupied areas.  The Russian Federation needed to uphold its duty as an occupying power, and cease the violations in reporting, as well as grant access to the occupied territories of Ukraine and the Russian Federation.    

Oral Update of the High Commissioner on Cooperation with Georgia

CHRISTIAN SALAZAR, Director of the Field Operations and Technical Cooperation Division of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, presenting the High Commissioner’s oral update on cooperation with Georgia, as mandated in Council resolution 52/40, said as in previous years, technical assistance had continued to be provided to the Government, civil society and other actors to strengthen the promotion and protection of human rights in Georgia.  The next report would provide updates on the situation, and provide human rights challenges in various regions in the country. 

Georgia’s engagement with the treaty bodies was welcomed: four different treaty bodies had discussed Georgia’s reports.  On the process of the harmonisation of national legislation with international standards on the right to a fair trial, it was hoped this would be expedited with an updated code on offences.  The draft law on foreign influences had been voted down by the Parliament: the authorities should conduct an effective investigation into allegations of the use of force during the mass protests that occurred in that context.  A number of persons engaged in violence in the context of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender events had been put on trial and sentenced to prison terms.  Decisive steps should be taken to improve the right to peaceful protest and assembly for all, including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender organizations. 

The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights’ request for immediate access to Abkhazia and South Ossetia had not been granted for several years.  The lack of access by international human rights organization mechanisms continued to hinder efforts to protect human rights in the regions, from where allegations of human rights violations continued to arrive, including on ethnic minorities.  The Office continued to call for the lifting of all movement restrictions at administrator boundary lines without delay.  Sustainable solutions were needed regarding personal identity and other documents and exercising the freedom of movement. 

Cases of alleged violation of the right to life in Abkhazia and South Ossetia continued to be reported, as did allegations of violations of the right to liberty: these should be investigated and resolved in line with international human rights law.  It was essential to provide accountability and redress.  All stakeholders should take concrete action to implement all pending recommendations issuing from Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights’ reports to the Council.

Statement by Country Concerned

Georgia, speaking as a country concerned, said this year again, the resolution adopted by the Council continued to address the dire human rights situation in the Russian-occupied regions and Georgia and demanded access for the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and other mechanisms to the occupied regions.  International mechanisms including the United Nations were denied access by the Russian Federation.  The consequences of the Russian occupation had been widely illustrated in previous reports, speaking about the persistent reoccurrences of human rights violations, particularly affecting ethnic-Georgians.  Linguistic discrimination was prevalent among this. 

Russia’s occupation left the people in the occupied territories in precarious conditions, leaving them at risk of becoming internally displaced persons.  The Russian Federation was urged to fulfil its international obligations and responsibilities, withdraw its military forces, cease human rights violations, and ensure the safe return of refugees and internally displaced persons to their home of origin.  The resolution of the Council was vital for preventing the conflict-affected people of Georgia from being further exacerbated.  Georgia looked forward to the report of the High Commissioner to be presented at the Council next September. 

Action on Resolution under Agenda Item Two on the Annual Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and Reports of the Office of the High Commissioner and the Secretary-General

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.21) on the Situation of human rights in Eritrea, adopted by a vote of 18 in favour, 7 against and 21 abstentions, the Council decides to extend the mandate of Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Eritrea for a further period of one year; requests the Special Rapporteur to submit and present a report to the Council at its fifty-sixth session, and to the General Assembly at its seventy-eighth session; decides to hold an enhanced interactive dialogue on the situation of human rights in Eritrea at its fifty-fifth session, with the participation of, inter alia, the Special Rapporteur, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, civil society and other relevant stakeholders; calls upon the Government of Eritrea to cooperate fully with the Human Rights Council and its mechanisms, including the Special Rapporteur, including by granting him access to the country and committing to making progress on the recommendations included in his reports and on the benchmarks and associated indicators proposed in 2019; encourages the Government of Eritrea to implement the recommendations accepted by the State during the third cycle of the universal periodic review; requests the Secretary-General to provide the Special Rapporteur with all the information and resources necessary to fulfil the mandate; and decides to remain seized of the matter.

The results of the vote were as follows:

In favour (18): Argentina, Belgium, Chile, Costa Rica, Czechia, Finland, France, Germany, Honduras, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mexico, Montenegro, Paraguay, Romania, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States.

Against (7): China, Cuba, Eritrea, India, Pakistan, Somalia and Sudan.

Abstentions (21): Algeria, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Gabon, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Morocco, Nepal, Qatar, Senegal, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan and Viet Nam.

Action on Resolutions under Agenda Item Three on the Promotion and Protection of All Human Rights, Civil, Political, Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, including the Right to Development

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.2) on Business and human rights, adopted without a vote, the Council requests the High Commissioner for Human Rights to convene a yearly consultation regarding challenges, good practices and the implementation of the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, and to submit a report thereon to the Council at its sixty-second session; invites the Working Group on the issue of human rights and transnational corporations and other business enterprises to chair the Forum on Business and Human Rights and to submit a report on the proceedings and thematic recommendations of the Forum to the Council for its consideration; decides to extend the mandate of the Working Group for a period of three years; requests the Secretary-General and the High Commissioner to provide the Working Group with all the resources and assistance necessary to fulfil its mandate effectively; and to provide the Forum, in a transparent manner, with all the services and facilities necessary.

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.4) on the Mandate of the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, adopted without a vote, the Council demands that all States take effective action to prevent, combat and eliminate extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions; calls on all States to conduct prompt, effective, thorough, independent, impartial and transparent investigations into all suspected cases of extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions; requests the Special Rapporteur to continue to examine situations of extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions in all circumstances, and to submit the findings on an annual basis, together with conclusions and recommendations, to the Council and the General Assembly; urges States to cooperate with and assist the Special Rapporteur in the performance of his or her tasks, and to ensure appropriate follow-up to the recommendations and conclusions of the Special Rapporteur; requests the Secretary-General to provide the Special Rapporteur with adequate human, financial and material resources in order to enable him or her to carry out the mandate effectively; and decides to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions for three years.

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.7) on the Mandate of the Independent Expert on human rights and international solidarity, adopted by a vote of 31 in favour, 13 against and 3 abstentions, the Council decides to extend the mandate of Independent Expert on human rights and international solidarity for a period of three years; requests all States, United Nations agencies, other relevant international organizations and non-governmental organizations to mainstream the right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity into their activities, and to give serious consideration to responding favourably to the requests of the Independent Expert to visit their countries to enable him to fulfil his mandate effectively; also requests the Independent Expert to continue to examine in his reports ways and means of overcoming existing and emerging obstacles to the realization of the right of peoples and individuals to international solidarity and to seek the views and contributions of Governments, United Nations agencies and other relevant international organizations in this regard; requests the Secretary-General and the High Commissioner for Human Rights to provide the Independent Expert with all the human and financial resources necessary for the effective fulfilment of the mandate; requests the Independent Expert to report regularly to the Council and to the General Assembly in accordance with their respective programmes of work; and decides to continue its consideration of this matter under the same agenda item.

The results of the vote were as follows:

In favour (31): Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Cote d’Ivoire, Cuba, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Paraguay, Qatar, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan and Viet Nam.

Against (13): Belgium, Czechia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Montenegro, Romania, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States.

Abstentions (3): Mexico, Morocco and Somalia.

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.9) on Human rights and climate change, adopted without a vote, the Council urges States that have not yet ratified or acceded to the Paris Agreement to do so; encourages the Parties to support the work of the Transitional Committee to operationalize expeditiously the new funding arrangements in responding to loss and damage associated with the adverse impacts of climate change; calls upon all States to adopt a country-driven, comprehensive, integrated, gender-responsive, age-inclusive and disability-inclusive approach to climate change adaptation and mitigation policies; decides that the annual panel discussion to be held at the fifty-sixth session shall focus on ensuring livelihood resilience in the context of the risk of loss and damage related to the adverse effects of climate change, and also decides that the panel discussion will have International Sign interpretation and captioning; requests the High Commissioner for Human Rights to submit a summary report on the panel discussion held at the fifty-sixth session to the Council at its fifty-eighth session, and to make the report available in accessible formats; requests the Secretary-General to conduct an analytical study on the impact of loss and damage from the adverse effects of climate change on the full enjoyment of human rights, and to submit the study to the Council at its fifty-seventh session, to be followed by an interactive dialogue, and also requests the Secretary-General to make the report available in accessible formats; requests the Secretary-General and the High Commissioner for Human Rights to provide all the human, technical and financial assistance necessary for the effective and timely realization of the panel discussion, reports and interactive dialogue; and decides to remain seized of the matter.

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.10) on The right to education, adopted without a vote, the Council urges all States to give full effect to the right to education by all appropriate means and without discrimination of any kind; calls upon States to promote holistic technical vocational education and training, and work-based learning in all its forms for all as well as lifelong learning and further education and training; to continue to strengthen the protection of preschools, schools, universities and other education institutions against attacks and threats of attack; to take appropriate measures to accelerate efforts to bridge the digital divide and technological gaps in order to increase digital competencies while ensuring the protection of personal data; and to consider providing free, public, inclusive, equitable and quality early childhood care and education; the Council decides to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on the right to education for a further period of three years; requests all States to cooperate fully with the Special Rapporteur, to give due consideration to the recommendations made by the mandate holder and to respond favourably to her or his requests for information and visits; requests that the Secretary-General and the High Commissioner for Human Rights continue to provide the Special Rapporteur with all the human and financial resources necessary for the effective fulfilment of the mandate; and that the Special Rapporteur continue to submit an annual report to the Council and to the General Assembly covering all activities relating to the mandate.

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.11) on the Elimination of discrimination against persons affected by leprosy (Hansen’s disease) and their family members, adopted without a vote, the Council decides to extend the mandate of the Special Rapporteur, under the title Special Rapporteur on the elimination of discrimination against persons affected by leprosy (Hansen’s disease) and their family members, for a period of three years; calls upon all States to cooperate with the Special Rapporteur in the discharge of the mandate, including by providing all information requested, to give serious consideration to responding favourably to the requests of the Special Rapporteur to visit their countries, and to consider implementing the recommendations made in the reports of the mandate holder; requests the Secretary-General and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to provide the Special Rapporteur with all the human, technical and financial resources necessary for the effective fulfilment of the mandate; and decides to remain seized of the matter.

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.12) on Trafficking in persons, especially women and children, adopted without a vote, the Council urges States to protect, respect and fulfil the human rights of victims of trafficking, and to prevent and to fight trafficking in persons, especially women and children, for the purpose of all forms of exploitation; urges States that have not yet done so to consider ratifying or acceding to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, and the Protocol against the Smuggling of Migrants by Land, Sea and Air; decides to extend the mandate of Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, for a period of three years; urges all Governments to cooperate fully with the Special Rapporteur and to respond favourably to requests to visit their countries; requests the Special Rapporteur to cooperate closely with the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, and to attend and participate in the annual and biennial sessions thereof, upon invitation; and requests the High Commissioner for Human Rights to ensure that the Special Rapporteur receives the resources necessary to discharge the mandate fully.

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.15) on Extreme poverty and human rights, adopted without a vote,  the Council decides to extend, for a period of three years, the mandate of the Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, as set out in Human Rights Council resolution 8/11; requests the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to continue to give high priority to the issue of extreme poverty and human rights, to pursue further work in this area in full cooperation with the Special Rapporteur in the various activities, and to continue to provide the Special Rapporteur with all the human and budgetary assistance necessary for the effective fulfilment of the mandate; requests the Special Rapporteur to submit an annual report on the implementation of the present resolution to the General Assembly and to the Human Rights Council, in accordance with their programmes of work; and to participate in relevant international dialogues and policy forums relating to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and to undertake thematic research with a view to advising States and relevant State institutions on the eradication of extreme poverty in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

In a resolution (A/HRC/53/L.19) on the Enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, adopted by a vote of 33 in favour, 13 against and 1 abstentions, the Council urges all actors on the international scene to build an international order based on human dignity and the promotion of and respect for cultural diversity and universal human rights; requests the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to seek to enhance dialogue with representatives from non-traditional donor countries with a view to broadening the donor base and to replenishing the resources available to the funds; urges States to take the measures necessary to enhance international cooperation aimed at addressing the adverse impact of consecutive and compounded global crises on the full enjoyment of human rights; requests the High Commissioner to organize a series of regional seminars on the contribution of North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation to the enjoyment of all human rights; requests the Secretary-General to provide all resources necessary for the above-mentioned regional seminars; requests the High Commissioner to prepare a summary report on the discussions held at the seminars and to present the report to the Human Rights Council at its sixtieth session; requests the High Commissioner to prepare a new report on the work of the Office of the High Commissioner in the implementation and enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, proposing also possible ways to face the challenges to the protection of human rights and to submit the report to the Council at its fifty-sixth session; and decides to continue its consideration of the matter in accordance with its annual programme of work.

The results of the vote were as follows:

In favour (33): Algeria, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Cameroon, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Cote d’Ivoire, Cuba, Eritrea, Gabon, Gambia, Honduras, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Morocco, Nepal, Pakistan, Paraguay, Qatar, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan and Viet Nam.

Against (13): Belgium, Czechia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Montenegro, Romania, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States.

Abstentions (1): Mexico.


Link: https://www.ungeneva.org/en/news-media/meeting-summary/2023/07/le-conseil-des-droits-de-lhomme-adopte-dix-resolutions

 

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Produced by the United Nations Information Service in Geneva for use of the media;
not an official record. English and French versions of our releases are different as they are the product of two separate coverage teams that work independently.

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